Wednesday, 5 November 2014

SYNTHESIS SCHOOL

synth school pic

SYNTHESIS SCHOOL with Christian Moraga & David Burraston

This years final ‘WIRED AWS’ professional development workshop, with funding support available for emerging and mid-career artists from around Australia. One day of instruction and "synthesis school" & one day of recording, for artists, musicians, performers, sound designers etc.

DAY ONE: 
Introduction to the synthesizer & first principles (analogue / digital / modular / subtractive / FM / RM etc)
Background to instruments, sequencers and programming
Differences between analogue CV/Gate & digital MIDI synthesizer interfaces / interconnection
End of first day with a hands-on session

DAY TWO: 
Recording & experimentation time with all of the gear hooked up to an iMac, Logic, hi quality multi channel audio interface & speakers
Recorded material will be available to each participant to make a track or piece of work after the workshop
Discussion session / Q&A on performing/recording & workshop recorded material

Some instruments will be provided for use at the workshop, but feel to bring your own instruments & recording equipment. Enrolment to this workshop is via an EOI process. There is also financial assistance for artists to attend, refer to the WIRED AWS information in this newsletter.

Saturday 6 & Sunday 7 December @ Cootamundra High School
Saturday 3pm - 8pm, followed by dinner with workshop participants
Sunday 8.30am - 12.30pm

NB: These workshop times are to accommodate train arrivals & departures from Sydney and Melbourne. Historically this seems to be the preferred mode of transport for w/shop participants.
moraga w_shop pic
CHRISTIAN MOREGA Scientist, synthesist, designer and builder – these four terms best describe self-confessed electronics nerd, Christian Moraga. His post-grad education in physics and chemistry evolved into a fascination with electronics and soon became his chosen path, with the past ten years having worked in valve amplification and synthesis electronics. His own business, cubisteffects, has seen him create custom bespoke instruments for experimental/noise musicians, both local and abroad, with his own music being released as Oscillateur. Oscillateur embraces the DIY electronics that Christian has become known for with each musical project influenced by the instruments he designs and builds. Christian currently works for Roland Australia.
  noyzelab-Logo-Text-400x400
DAVE BURRASTON One of the founding members of The Wired Lab, Burraston is an artist/scientist who has been involved in AV technology, music and electronic arts since the 70s, with a particular specialisation in synthesizers, or ‘sympathizers’ according to his granny. In 2006 Burraston was awarded a PhD in generative music and internationally he is recognised as a leading practitioner/theorist in this area. Burraston has released several albums under the moniker of ‘Dave Noyze' and runs his own independent research studio: www.noyzelab.com  

$ for artists

FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR ARTISTS: WIRED AWS (ARTISTS WORKSHOP SCHEME) The WIRED AWS Scheme provides financial assistance for emerging and mid career artists from around Australia to attend Wired Lab workshops and initiatives. For ‘Synthesis School’ The Wired Lab will be offering funding support to assist 8-10 artists with the costs to attend the workshop. Artists who consider themselves to be ‘emerging’ or ‘mid career’ are invited to submit a brief expression of interest (EOI) detailing their arts practice and how they feel they will benefit from being a WIRED AWS participant.

On your EOI please cite the cost of your return travel to/from Cootamundra NSW and keep your EOI to 1 A4 page. Also note that we don’t follow age determined definitions of ‘emerging’ we expect you to determine where you place your practice and experience. Musicians and Interdisciplinary artists are encouraged to apply.

WIRED AWS and our residency programs are supported by the Federal Government through Australia Council for the Arts, and the NSW Government through Arts NSW.

WIRED AWS expressions of interest are due Wednesday 26th November (places will be confirmed no later than Friday 28th November)

To obtain an EOI form email: workshops { @  } wiredlab . org   

Saturday, 27 September 2014

16 x 16 CELL MEDITATIONS : NOYZELAB


16 x 16 CELL MEDITATIONS : NOYZELAB

limited cassette


*WARNING* This cassette tape of electronically produced meditation drones has been precisely composed and engineered for listening, relaxing and formal meditation practice (movement or stationary). It is not advisable to play this tape while driving or operating heavy machinery, or any other activity that requires you to concentrate on the task at hand. No responsibility or liability is accepted for use or misuse of this material in any way whatsoever.

Instruments : Hinton Music Lab Modular (processing), Noyzelab Custom 4 Voice Microtonal Drone Oscillators (0.01Hz resolution sound source)


Recorded at Noyzelab Studio, September 2013

Coming soon on meds

In the meantime here is a currently unreleased electronic drone meditation by NOYZELAB :




Review of 16x16 CELL MEDITATIONS by Norman Records -->


8/10 from Jim (Staff) on 10 November 2014 




Noyzelab is basically David Burraston (aka Dave Noyze), a guy who, has spent the last few decades venturing ever deeper into the hidden complexities of electronic music. According to a recent two-part sprawling interview/conversation with his old mate, Richard James (aka Aphex Twin), Noyze explains how this current recording was created to address the dearth of decent meditational music tools using a bank of custom built microtonal oscillators. What you get on this C90 cassette is two sidelong tracks of pulsating electronic drones which are so mesmerising the label has issued a (tongue in cheek?) warning about not operating machinery etc. while under their influence.

The first side offers up a high energy drone based around the interplay of a relentlessly oscillating bass wobble and mid-frequency buzz. Over this there is the rapid flicker of a high-mid frequency tone along with higher frequency textures providing sizzle and crackle. Of course, the point with most drones, like their op-art counterparts, is not so much their individual constituent parts but the the effects produced by their relationships and interactions. This drone is particularly satisfying as it makes me feel that my needs are being met right across the audible frequency spectrum. The distinctly electronic quality of the sound has me feeling like I've been wired up to the national grid, the constant flow of the current strangely reassuring. Imagine a distillation of the most hypnotic parts of Spaceman 3 at their most abstract or Suicide if they just played one instead of two note riffs and you wouldn't be a million miles off imagining how this sounds. 

The second side features a different flavoured drone, fading in with circling, phase shifting crackle over a purring frequency arrangement that for some reason sounds to me like a shuddering boat engine. As with the first track, the interactions between the various elements within the drone are quite complex so that even the slightest movement on the part of the listener or shift in listening focus seems to affect how the track sounds. In fact, this factor is so much part of the listening experience that it's hard for me to say whether the tracks evolve at all during their 40+ minute span or whether any apparent evolution is just an aural illusion arising out of my shifting perceptions. Playing this on different cassette players will no doubt add their mechanical quirks into the equation. Recommended for drone connoisseurs or anyone really who is interested in the psychedelics of pure sound.          





Thursday, 18 September 2014

Zeus B Held (Music Producer) Interview - E&MM 1985 Tim Goodyer

Ultra rare interview with legendary German electronic music producer Zeus B Held (John Foxx, Black Uhuru, Alphaville). Held also produced the classic track No GDM by Gina X... Interview by Tim Goodyer, scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, July 1985. Have included the youtube vid of No GDM by Gina X at the bottom of this post.

Wednesday, 17 September 2014

Hinton Music Lab module closeup - Multimode Filter

A bunch of close up pictures of the Hinton Music Lab modular ML1502 VC Multimode Filter and some sound examples. This is quite a unique VCF module, and my Music Lab contains three of them. The filter cutoff frequency can be adjusted with ultra-precision using a 10 turn lockable potentiometer, usually only found on VCO's. The filter Q (resonance) is also switchable between normal (fully resonating) and limited.

The outputs are low pass, high pass and band pass with both level and +/- phase adjustable. The inputs are duplicated to nuclear physics spec Lemo connectors which connect to the virtual earth inputs on the module, allowing input signals to be summed directly on the Pin Matrix module. Also note that two of these modules are designated ML1501, although they are actually ML1502's underneath. The ML1501 panels have a slightly different layout which includes a voltage controlled Q input, although this is not connected internally and the PCB's are all designated as ML1502. I've included a set of pictures of the differences in these panels.

The Music Lab was built by Graham Hinton back in the mid 70's. I've not mentioned this in earlier posts, but the Music Lab is actually a prototype modular that never went into production. In some respects it is a pre-cursor to the current Hinton Instruments Eurorack synth modules, although the Music Lab format is a 4U rack frame size. There are a number of other differences that I'll hopefully get around to mentioning in future posts, as well as there being a lot more module types in the Music Lab.


I've used the Hinton Music Lab on lots of my recordings, but the VC Filter was the first module I ever recorded, as I bought this first prior to the getting the entire modular in 1997. The following Bryen Telko track HINTONE contains a main riff on the filter (recorded in 1996), also using a Roland System 100M modular and sequencing with a Roland MC4. Additional noises used on this track were recorded on my Korg MS20 in 1985 (a carbon granule telephone mouthpiece into the external signal processor for vocals) + also on this track are a tweaked up Roland TR606 + Doepfer A112 VC Sampler (more on my algorithmic/generative experiments with the A112 module here).



Monday, 15 September 2014

Ulamizer II Cellular Automata Sequencer - SOUND EXCERPT + more pix from 2006/7

Ulamizer II Cellular Automata Sequencer sound excerpt + more pix from 2006/7. See the earlier Ulamizer II post for more info.


The pictures below are from my studio in the Blue Mountains, Australia back in 2006/7. The main modular synth seen in this setup is my Hinton Music Lab Modular. The Hinton Music Lab is particular suited to my CA module tests as it has a completely unique 8 bit logic bus that connects its sequencer, switch and counter modules together, so I can drive that bus directly from the cell gate outputs. The Ulamizer II guts are in the black box & another small circuit board hanging off that in the flightcase under the Hinton Pin Matrix.

Rhodes Chroma Review - One.. Two.. Testing magazine 1982

Short review of the Rhodes Chroma + the colour advert in the same magazine. Scanned from my copy of One.. Two.. Testing  magazine Issue No1 1982 (no author was credited in the review).


Sunday, 14 September 2014

BBC Radiophonic Workshop Equipment List - 1985

BBC Radiophonic Workshop equipment list from 1985, including all the serial numbers for each piece of gear. This was an addendum to an earlier article on the workshop in Electronics & Music Maker called Aunties Playroom. This listing is scanned from my copy : November 1985.


disclaimer: i dont know who owns the copyright these days, at the time it was music maker publications ltd.

Saturday, 13 September 2014

Hinton Music Lab module closeup - ML1812 Sequence Generator

Some close up pictures of the Hinton Music Lab modular ML1812 Sequence Generator. The ML1812 was built by Graham Hinton back in the mid 70's using wire wrapping! This module also has a logic buss at the rear for the 8 sequence bits, which I can interface directly to my MANIAC & Arthur prototype systems. This makes them particularly handy for being modulated by Cellular Automata logic patterns.



Here are some example recordings of the Hinton Music Lab in action :

 

Friday, 12 September 2014

Acorn Music 500 Synthesizer Review - E&MM 1984 David Ellis

In-depth review of Acorn's Music 500 Synthesizer for the BBC Micro. Article by David Ellis, scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, December 1984.

Erasure Interview - E&MM 1986 Tim Goodyer

In-depth interview with Erasure (Vince Clarke & Andy Bell) covering details of music tech gear used by the band. Interview by Tim Goodyer, scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, August 1986.

Wednesday, 10 September 2014

Dave Noyze - Jupiter 4 Mountain



Roland Jupiter-4 (my own custom CV/Gate mod) & MC4 + sundry synth clatterboxing + home built ring modulator

Recorded 2005 at Noyzelab Studio, Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia

Bunch of studio pictures below taken around the time this track was recorded



How Vince Clarke made Yazoo's "Only You" synth sounds...

Five sets of panel layouts for the SCI Pro One synth by Vince Clarke, for the track Only You by Yazoo. Scanned from my copy of One.. Two.. Testing  magazine Issue No1 1982 (no author was credited in the magazine).



Tuesday, 9 September 2014

Hinton Music Lab module closeup - ML1302 Trapezoid EG

Some close up pictures of the Hinton Music Lab modular's ML1302 Trapezoid EG. This module also has a series of logic outs for the different stages of the EG cycle. Module includes audio in/out which is level controlled internally by the EG. Controls : Attack Time, On Time, Decay Time, Delay Time, Trapezoid +/-, Signal +/-, Switch (Gated, Cycle, Single), Manual Gate Switch.  The inputs are duplicated to nuclear physics spec Lemo connectors which connect to the virtual earth inputs on the module, allowing input signals to be summed directly on the Pin Matrix module. The ML1320 was built by Graham Hinton back in the mid 70's using wire wrapping!


Here is an example (recorded March 2013) of this module setup with Hinton ML VCO's (more on these in a future post), the ML1890 switch and the ML Pin Matrix module :



Here are some more example recordings of the Hinton Music Lab in action :


Monday, 8 September 2014

Modes of Operation - Depeche Mode Interview E&MM 1986 (Paul Tingen)

Modes of Operation - A very rare Depeche Mode interview covering in-depth details of music tech gear used by the band. Interview by Paul Tingen, scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, August 1986.

ZX81 Polyphonic Sequencer Part 4 - E&MM March 1982 (Peter Maydew)

Part 4 of the four part ZX81 Polyphonic Sequencer articles from E&MM. This one covers the music entry program written in BASIC.

This article is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, March 1982. Article written by Peter Maydew.

Note that at the end of part 3 there is an errata for this article series!! (nothing too heavy, but you best check it out first!). Part 1 is here & part 2 is here


Gallery of Misfits E&MM Sept 1985 (David Ellis)

Gallery of Misfits by David Ellis with some rare pics of obscure synths that didn't make it. Includes a picture of the rarely ever photo'd EMS Datasynth (also known as Datasynthi). The only other pic I've found of the EMS Datasynth is here.

Article scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Sept 1985.

Friday, 5 September 2014

Hinton Music Lab module closeup - ML1820 Counter

Some close up pictures of the Hinton Music Lab modular's ML1820 Counter. This module also has a logic buss at the rear for the 8 counter bits, which I can interface directly to my MANIAC & Arthur prototype systems. This makes them particularly handy for being modulated by Cellular Automata logic patterns. The ML1820 was built by Graham Hinton back in the mid 70's using wire wrapping!



Here are some example recordings of the Hinton Music Lab in action :



Emu SP-12 Sampling Drum Machine Review - E&MM Sept 1985 (Paul Wiffen & Annabel Scott)

Review of the legendary Emu SP-12 Sampling Drum Machine, successor to the Drumulator. Review by Paul Wiffen & Annabel Scott, scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Sept 1985.


ZX81 Polyphonic Sequencer Part 2 - E&MM Jan 1982 (Peter Maydew)

Part 2 of the four part ZX81 Polyphonic Sequencer articles from E&MM. This one covers the circuit for the I/O port that will allow D/A converters to be connected, or for directly driving synths with a digital interface such as the EDP Wasp or Maplin/ETI 3800 & 5600 (+ see here). Also included in this article is a little polyphonic sequencer program written in Sinclair BASIC!

This article is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Dec 1981. Article written by Peter Maydew.


Note that at the end of part 3 there is an errata for this article series!! (nothing too heavy, but you best check it out first!). Part 1 is here


Hinton Music Lab module closeup - ML1890 Switch

Some close up pictures of the Hinton Music Lab modular's ML1890 Switch. This module is pretty special having a logic buss at the rear for the 8 switches which I can interface directly to my MANIAC & Arthur prototype systems. This makes them particularly handy for being modulated by Cellular Automata logic patterns. The ML1890 can switch both audio and control voltages and was built by Graham Hinton back in the mid 70's !  The inputs are duplicated to nuclear physics spec Lemo connectors which connect to the virtual earth inputs on the module, allowing input signals to be summed directly on the Pin Matrix module.



Here are some example recordings of the Hinton Music Lab in action :



Movement Percussion Computer Review - E&MM Jan 1982 (Dave Crombie)

Review of the ultra rare Movement Percussion Computer, as heard and seen in the Eurythmics : Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This) video with Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart. This review is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Jan 1982. Review written by Dave Crombie.


Roland SBX80 Sync Box Review - E&MM Feb 1985 (Paul White)

Review of the Roland SBX80 Sync Box, a fully goes intta / goes outta box for synchronizing all kinds of stuff to all kinds of other stuff! Review by Paul White, scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Feb 1985.

Roland have now revisited this box in the form of the newly available SBX-1 Sync Box.


Step Time Sequencer for EDP Wasp Synth & C64 - E&MM Nov 84 (Jethro Hill)

Ever wanted to hook up your EDP Wasp to a Commodore 64 sequencer? This article by Jethro Hill is the very thing. Not only is there a little step time sequencer program in Commodore BASIC, there are simple instructions on how to interface to a Wasp synth without the need for any external circuitry or interface! Just a cable! + from what I can tell this is a simple version of the code for one of the Joreth Music Systems programs.

Also, the keyboard on the normal Wasp only had 25 notes, this sequencer allows you to access the full 33 note range, thats an extra 8 notes!

Article scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Nov 1984.


ZX81 Polyphonic Sequencer Part 1 - E&MM Jan 1982 (Peter Maydew)

I've done some further digging around in my boxes of old E&MM mags, and found out that the ultra minimal ZX81 polyphonic sequencer was a four part article series, and luckily enough I've got all of them. I posted up part 3 a few days back which covers the CV out interface & some polyphonic sequencer machine code, and its been pretty popular, so I am scanning the other 3 parts.

Here is part 1 which gives a good introduction to those unfamiliar with ZX81 and will help with understanding specifics of the other 3 parts (little machine code monitor, keyboard reading business & ZX81 hardware).

Note that at the end of part 3 there is an errata for this article series!! (nothing too heavy, but you best check it out first!). Part 2 is here.

This article is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Dec 1981. Article written by Peter Maydew.


Thursday, 4 September 2014

Janko Keyboard Synth for BBC BASIC - One Two Testing Jan 1985 (Andy Honeybone)

Short article and two Janko Keyboard synth program listings in BBC BASIC (probably one of my favourite programming languages of all time). These programs allow you to play the BBC sound chip from the QWERTY keyboard layed out in the Janko arrangement.

They are both the same program functionally, one is easy to read, but the other one is more compressed and runs faster. Top stuff and not a GOTO in sight! Note : Raspberry Pi users running RISC OS will be able to type this in and get it running on their machines + this program should also work on any RISC OS machine running BBC BASIC.

Programs and article written by Andy Honeybone, scanned from my copy of (the ultra short lived) One Two Testing magazine, January 1985.  


Linn LM-1 Drum Computer Review - E&MM September 1981 (Warren Cann of Ultravox)

In depth review of the Linn LM-1 Drum Computer by Ultravox drummer & drum machine programmer Warren Cann. This review is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Sept 1981.

 

Wednesday, 3 September 2014

The Bradford Musical Instrument Simulator!

This one is a bit of a revelation... have never spotted this before, but while scanning the Laurie Anderson interview I was thumbing through Electronics & Music Maker magazine and came across an interesting letter on the letter's page. The letter was from Dr P J Comerford of the University of Bradford, UK, about an additive synth they developed called the Bradford Musical Instrument Simulator (BMIS), which can synthesize waveforms with up to 255 harmonics and have up to 512 waveform generators!

Dr P J Comerford, University of Bradford, UK

The letter was written in response to the Patrick Mimram additive synth article detailing the University of Bradford's synth, and I've scanned the letter and included it in this post below. Naturally this aroused my curiosity so I did a web search and discovered that the BMIS system is still being developed. It is now called Bradford Enhanced Synthesis Technology (BEST) and you can go to their website and check out the details. I'll quote a few parts here :


Principal technological features of BEST are:
  • A facility for specifying and playing complex multiple cycle waveforms, synthesised from individual partials with independently controllable amplitude and frequency envelopes which can change from cycle to cycle as required. 
  • amplitude envelopes for single cycle waveforms implemented as a series of hardware-controlled ramps instead of a series of steps, greatly reducing unwanted noise during amplitude changes.
  • 16 bit waveform storage and output resolution and 24 bit waveform arithmetic resolution preserved over a 48dB range.
  • 8 output channels per sound module (64 in total) each with a sample output rate of 42.7Ksamples per second.
  • a comprehensive graphical user interface for specifying waveform characteristics.

Envelope Studio for the current Bradford Enhanced Synthesis Technology (source: http://www.comp.brad.ac.uk/research/music/interface.htm)

Laurie Anderson : Making Music with Big Science - E&MM Feb 1985 (Dan Goldstein)

Rare interview with experimental performance artist Laurie Anderson : Making Music with Big Science. Discussing topics such as early samplers and her work with Jean-Michel Jarre. Scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Feb 1985. The article was written by Dan Goldstein.

Tuesday, 2 September 2014

Warren Cann (Ultravox) Interview - E&MM April 1981 (Mike Beecher)

Very in depth early interview with Ultravox drummer & drum machine programmer Warren Cann. Covers quite a lot of ground including information about his modifications to electronic drum machines. Also included in this interview is the sheet music to Mr. X by Ultravox. I've included a youtube of this track. This interview is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, April 1981. Interview by Mike Beecher.


Electronic Dream Plant - Gnat Synthesizer Ad - E&MM Sept 1981

Electronic Dream Plant - 2 page Gnat Synthesizer Ad - Scanned from my copy of  Electronics & Music Maker, Sept 1981. For in depth details & schematics of the Gnat check out Tim Stinchcombe's page here. Interestingly this advert mentions the Flea Sequencer, including a retail price, although this never made it to market. The ad also includes images of the Wasp Synthesizer, Spider Sequencer & Caterpiller Keyboard.

The Gnat cost 99 quid in 1981 (pretty much the cheapest synth on the market as I remember), so for your average schoolkid doing a paper round delivering newspapers (like I used to...) earning say 2 quid a week it would have taken 99/2 = 49.5 weeks to get the cash together for this highly desirable box...! this time could be reduced if the christmas tip period was included.

 

Kraftwerk Revealed - E&MM Sept 1981 (Mike Beecher)

Ultra in depth interview with Ralf Hutter of Kraftwerk during the 1981 tour, including full details of the live setup of Kling Klang Studio. Note this interview also includes a computer program in Sharp BASIC to display Computer World track names & band members with hyper-minimal graphics. This interview is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Sept 1981. Interview by Mike Beecher.


PAIA 8700 Computer/Controller Review - E&MM April 1981 (Dr David Ellis)

Ultra rare in-depth technical review of the ultra rare PAIA 8700 Computer/Controller. This review is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, April 1981. Article written by Dr David Ellis.

The original PAIA assembly/user manual is available from the Cloned Analog Gear website (part1 & part2). A corrected circuit diagram is available via The Old Crow (Scott Rider) website here.

 

Generative Music on the Roland MC4 MicroComposer Part 2 (more pix) - Cellular Automata Sequencing


Part 2 of a post about making generative music with Cellular Automata (CA) sequences with the Roland MC4 sequencer. With well known works from composers such as Vince Clarke & Aphex Twin the musical applications of the MC4 cover a lot of ground. Over the years I've been playing around with different ways of working with this box since I got my first one in 1997, and I started integrating it with my algorithmic / generative composition processes.



The method I used to generate the data values was adapted from an Australasian Computer Music Conference paper I presented in 2005 :

Burraston, D. (2005) Composition at the Edge of Chaos. Proceedings of the 2005 Australasian Computer Music Conference.(Brisbane, July 2005). PDF -> here 

The idea of using CA values is also valid for any type of algorithmic / generative data that you can scale to the MC4 parameter ranges (or any sequencer that takes number values e.g. MIDI). 

For more details please see part 1 post. This post is more of a picture fest of the setup, photo's taken in 2007 at Noyzelab.

Korg Trident Review - E&MM Feb 1982 (Mike Beecher & Peter Maydew)


Early review article of the classic Korg Trident analogue polysynth. This article is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Feb 1982. Article written by Mike Beecher & Peter Maydew. Also included is a bonus B&W ad of the Korg Delta string synth from the same issue.



Monday, 1 September 2014

Powertran Digital Delay & MCS-1 - Automata 52 setup

Some gratuitous pix below of the setup for the track A Logical Calculus of the Ideas Immanent in Feline Activity on the album Dave Noyze : Automata 52. This track also features field recordings kindly donated by Chris Watson. This CD was limited to 52 copies, but you can now get it in digital format from Cataclyst.


The setup shows a Powertran MCS-1 sampler which features both MIDI and voltage control (& all manner of other weirdness), and a Powertran Digital Delay Line with some additional modifications to allow for external pitch and trigger control. More info on the Powertran Digital Delay Line modifications can be found here & here. Both of these Powertran machines were designed by the now legendary Tim Orr and published in Electronics & Music Maker magazine.



Keen eyed spotters should note the more recent additional modification on the Powertran Digital Delay Line, which is a little mod I devised especially for the Automata 52 album. This is the little switch hanging over the front panel. The details are classified at the moment, but the upshot is that I can change the sample rate in realtime from my own external clock modules, and both underdrive until sampling halts & overdrive the sample rate until the converters can't handle it! Also in the pictures is a prototype cellular automata oscillator module with an OLED display, which was used to drive the pitch input on the Powertran Digital Delay Line.



Roland TR-606 Review - E&MM Feb 1982 (Tony Bacon)

Early review article of the classic Roland TR-606 Drumatix drum machine. This article is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Feb 1982. Article written by Martin Christie.


Sunday, 31 August 2014

Minerva - video

Video I made back in 2002 for an unreleased Dave Noyze track called "minerva".




The video is made up from a bunch of video sampling that I used to sometimes VJ for Rephlex / Aphex Twin / Mike Dred in late 90's & early 2000's. Fun times mixing VHS tape decks, computers and video camera's... This vid contains stuff like the Aricebo Interstellar Message, munged up images of my old Cellular Automata sequencers & munged up images of my website in an old mac html browser.

The soundtrack is made using a Doepfer A112 Voltage Controlled Sampler module. It uses a custom Max patch I built to send algorithmically generated wavetables to the A112.

ZX81 Polyphonic Sequencer Part 3 - E&MM Feb 1982 (Peter Maydew)

Wow, it didn't take much code or hardware to get a polyphonic sequencer together for the Sinclair ZX81!! All you need is a digital to analogue converter chip (DAC0801), a little extra circuitry & a handful of machine code. This article is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Feb 1982. Article written by Peter Maydew.

UPDATE (5-9-2014): Part 1 is here!


Saturday, 30 August 2014

Pierre Deutsche Mark V - video

Video originally constructed for Bryen Telko - Storm in a Mandelbrot NOT SET (Commissioned by Hull Time Based Arts for FIST 4) in 2002. This version of the video I put together for my Dave Noyze performance at Liquid Architecture Festival 2006 Sydney, for the track Pierre Deutsche Mark V.


Original track was simply called DM5, made in the 90's by self-referential / generative feedback sampler systems, using sounds sampled from various different analogue and digital synths. I generally called this style of tracks I made back then as very electronic. Also includes samples of Pierre Henry. The track appears on my album Dave Noyze - Generative Compositions 1998 - 2006 :



The video is made up from a bunch of video sampling that I used to sometimes VJ for Rephlex / Aphex Twin / Mike Dred in late 90's & early 2000's. Fun times mixing VHS tape decks, computers and video camera's... This vid contains stuff like: a munged up image of my Hinton Pin Matrix, my mouth, a harshly lit but darkside tunnel in Leeds, me & aNt (skeleton unit from Cataclyst) lying in church crypts in Leeds & munged up scientific visualisation software I used at British Telecom Research Labs.

Lectomy Menkota Redux - video

Video I put together for my performance at Liquid Architecture Festival 2006 Sydney, for the track Lectomy Menkota Redux.


It is actually a combination/re-edit of two tracks : Lectomy & Menkota made in the 90's by self-referential / generative feedback sampler systems, using sounds sampled from various different analogue and digital synths. I generally called this style of tracks I made back then as very electronic. The track appears on my album Dave Noyze - Generative Compositions 1998 - 2006 :



The video is made up from a bunch of video sampling that I used to sometimes VJ for Rephlex / Aphex Twin / Mike Dred in late 90's & early 2000's. Fun times mixing VHS tape decks, computers and video camera's... This vid contains stuff like UFO, mangled images of my synths, a video I made when I visited SETI's Aricebo Radio Telescope in Puerto Rico on tour with Mike Dred in 2000, and a whole heap of processed complex / chaotic systems.

The Hello Larry start is a long story, but briefly : It turned up by accident when I was recording & testing my newly built Practical Electronics Ring Modulator in 1988 with my radio and an oscillator. The dudes name is Larry Grason, a popular TV character from my mum's hometown.


Comdyna - The Analogue Computer music setup for CELLDYNA

A bunch of pictures and a brief bit of background on the Comdyna GP6 I used for the track CELLDYNA on my Automata 49 album ==>


For CELLDYNA I used minimal analogue computing elements (2 to 4 integrators, 2 potentiometers and an inverter) for direct sound synthesis from the GP6, hybridized with a digital Cellular Automata sequencer driving various different synths for the drum sounds.

The spoken word samples are from a 1969 lecture from EAI titled "Understanding the Analogue / Hybrid Computer". In order to use such a small amount of computing elements I setup a fairly messy chaotic style feedback patch. I did this intuitively pluging around to see what happens on the scope while listening to the output in realtime. This approach worked well for this track, and enabled me to get quick results without resorting to theory. I made a bunch of recordings during Dec 2008 & Jan 2009, which I then edited into the final track.

Comdyna GP6 & Oscilloscope - obligatory photo with the lights off to see the glowing lights better!



Landscape Explored Interview - E&MM November 1981 (Mike Beecher)

Interview with Landscape, well known for their Einstein A Go-Go & Norman Bates tracks. Interview written by Mike Beecher. Looks like they were well in with Roland, included is the inside front cover showing them advertising Roland clobber. Scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, November 1981.


Friday, 29 August 2014

Bhang : An Open Lassie - video

Video to the opening track Bhang : An Open Lassie from the album Dave Noyze : Generative Compositions 1998 - 2006, released by Cataclyst in 2008.







Algorithms (in decreasing order of importance) : Cellular Automata, Self Referential Paradox & HumanTwiddling.

Originally released in 2008 as a completely black CDr hand numbered edition of 50 in black clamshell case with wraparound 200gsm card sleeve housed in heavy duty PVC wallet. The CDr is now sold out but you can buy the digital copy through Cataclyst on Bandcamp.

Produced by Bradbury & Dave Noyze.
Additional fiddling on 02, 07 & 09 by Bradbury.


Norman Records were nice enough to review this album  in the following manner :

Right. What i want to finish the day is a crazed CD of intense electronics, warped classical pieces & general ear-shredding sonic cacophony. Dave Noyze, currently residing down under in Oz (He's getting booted out by immigration on the day of this release!), is a generative artist & scientist producing electronic sounds since the late 70s. His music is a bizarre, yet compelling journey investigating the outer realms of music generated on ancient & contemporary machines. You can one minute get screeing white noise, another, disorientating chinese water style madness, mixed with archive samples & feedback. 

Now I'm feeling frantic Venetian Snares-esque digital electro gabber that sounds like I-F in a blender. An "ambient" piece follows, sounding like the alternative soundtrack to Pan's Labyrinth, a lip biting hyper-trip in a ghost sleigh through a haunted forest full of Juddermen sporting bagpipes & moths full of pointy teeth. Eerie! More stuttering metal machine music follows sporting some obscure eastern European sourced library sample or other. This is breakcore before breakcore knew it's identity. Algorythmic aggro in space!. He's bouncing off the satellites here. 'Generative Compositions 1998-2006' is a fine collection of brilliantly produced & fascinating outsider electronics from a man who's built equipment for Aphex Twin amongst others, so we're talking a real prodigy here. 

The album features several collaberations with Garry Bradbury who was a member of australian electronic music pioneers Severed Heads.There are moments that are similar to the more fucked up Team Doyobi stuff and moments of spooky melody amongst the noisier shards, one tune like a treehouse full of cooing cyborg hens trapped in a maze of blooping circuitry. As ground breaking as early Art of Noise in their day is some of this ear deceiving gear. And up there with some of the more revered Jap noiselords. Normally, some sections could get on my nerves if i had it as background music. But you really need to let yourself be absorbed in the melee, for the possibilities here are just as alarming as the latest Autechre album, another recent feat of electronic progress. 

So here you have it! The debut release for a new CDr label, Cataclyst (deliberatlly released on 29th February), lovingly packaged on black CDrs in a black clamshell with wraparound card sleeve in PVC wallets. All releases in the schedule are to be limited to a mere 50 copies. When we have more info on further exciting progressions we'll keep you informed! 

Fairlight CMI Review - E&MM June 1981 (Dr David Ellis)


In depth technical review of the ultra legendary Fairlight CMI sampler + see The Holmes Page for more info. Although mind-numbingly expensive when it came out it ended being used by a wide variety of artists / studios including the BBC Radiophonic Workshop (see more articles on this site relating them here), Kate Bush, Stevie Wonder, The Art of Noise, SPK and Skinny Puppy. Review written by Dr David Ellis, based on an interview with Peter Vogel by Mike Beecher. Scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, June 1981.


Spacetime Gravity Modulator Part 3 - Eurorack prototype

unearthed another video form the archives (April 2012) of quick test of the spacetime gravity modulator eurorack prototype. this module is gravity/black hole-ish module, running a simulated physics with a little spaceship you can fly around. 



System Hinton 4a - How Noyzelab sounded back in 97


Here is another Hinton Music Lab track [System Hinton 4a excerpt] unearthed from the Noyzelab archives! This was recorded in 1997, and is among some of the first tracks I made with it. This track also used the Roland System 100m and System 100 modular synths.


Here are some bonus pix from Noyzelab Studio Suffolk, taken around the time this track was recorded.

Dave Noyze rockin out with the Hinton in his cardigan :) watch out for that Powertran Vocoder behind you!

David Vorhaus & Kaleidophon Studio - E&MM June 1981 (Dr David Ellis)

Detailed interview with David Vorhaus, notable in particular for information on his Kaleidophon Studio. Article written by Dr David Ellis. Scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, June 1981. A more recent Sound on Sound interview can be found here.


Thursday, 28 August 2014

Generative Music on the Roland MC4 MicroComposer - Cellular Automata Sequencing

Roland MC4 MicroComposer with a Cellular Automata text printout, connected to the Hinton Music Lab Modular (Noyzelab Studio 2007)

Lots of people are becoming familiar with the Roland MC4 MicroComposer and its become quite a legendary box over the years. With well known works from composers such as Vince Clarke & Aphex Twin the musical applications of the MC4 cover a lot of ground. Over the years I've been playing around with different ways of working with this box since I got my first one in 1997, and I started integrating it with my algorithmic / generative composition processes. 

The simplest way to get algorithmic data into the MC4 that I have used is driving it directly using my other CA sequencers MANIAC or Ulamizer-II using step record mode and manually punching in "measure ends" to get bunches of generative sequences recorded. One method that works well but is somewhat tedious (although good for mental focus) has been to generate text files with a series of number values using custom programs made in Mathematica. I first tried this laborious method in 2006 using Cellular Automata, around the time I finished my PhD. I did a brief page on it here and this post is a little more elaboration on that webpage.



Texas Instruments / Speak & Spell - Industry Profile - E&MM June 1981 (Mike Beecher)

Behind the scenes with Texas Instruments in the height of the Speak & Spell era. Check out all that juicy speech synthesis development clobber. Article scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, June 1981. Article written by Mike Beecher.


Wednesday, 27 August 2014

ARP 2600 resurrection vids

i got given this arp 2600 by wade maryknowsky about 5 years ago, he found it in a skip outside one of the art schools in sydney many years back. it is thought to have been used by stelarc to control a robot, hence the stickers.



after wade found it this arp 2600 spent several years in obscure effects box builder "hairy dan's" house, which meant it was covered in mould by the time i got it. 

there's quite a lot shot on it, including the power supply.

this is a couple of videos of it in dry dock in my workshop. had to make these videos by torchlight as my light bulb had just blown! managed to get some of it working, but this is gunna be a long term restoration project...  videos were made june 2010.



Dave Noyze - Out of Memory album :: videos+stills of the compositional process

Handful of videos showing some of the techniques used on the Dave Noyze Out of Memory album available on Cataclyst. Also included after the vids are some ancient grainy digital photo's taken during the recording of the album at Noyzelab Studio, Suffolk, UK that have just surfaced from the archives (including more pix of the Hinton Music Lab modular synth).



This album is a collection of algorithmic/generative works from chaos and complexity theory, made between 1997 & 2001 with modular and MIDI synthesizers. Systems were initially prototyped on Acorn machines (BBC Master,  Archimedes 310 & Risc PC) in earlier years using the BBC BASIC programming language. Apple machines running Max were used in the later stages. The algorithms were drawn from (among others) 1 and 2 dimensional Cellular Automata, Lorenz and other strange attractors, various mathematical functions/surfaces of 1 to 3 dimensions, 1/f Voss noise generator and the Logistic equation. These algorithms were used to directly control various modular and MIDI synthesizers.  The video's below were all made at Noyzelab, Australia on my Risc PC in 2010/2011 using a Yamaha RS7000.

This album, like much of my work up until then, was mainly distributed privately to friends and peers. It caught the attention of Dr Linda Candy, one of the founders of the Creativity & Cognition Research Studio at Loughborough University. Linda persuaded Prof Ernest Edmonds to look at my work and I ended up being invited to do a PhD (Generative Music & Cellular Automata) for their newly formed group in Australia, at the Univerity of Technology, Sydney in 2003. Around this time an ultra-limited release of the album came out via Tom Ellard's Sevcom Edition.


Yamaha GS1 & GS2 Review - E&MM Feb 1982 (Martin Christie)

Interesting and rare in depth article on Yamaha's legendary GS1 & GS2, their first commercial FM synths, also see Sound on Sound's article here. This article is scanned from my copy of Electronics & Music Maker, Feb 1982. Article written by Martin Christie.